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Lena Dunham Explains Why She Opened Up About Her Rape In Brave New Essay

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As the title of Lena Dunham's book asserts, she's Not That Kind Of Girl.

Not the kind of girl to sit quietly when she has something to say, and not the kind of girl who won't respond when she feels attacked.

And many parts of her book have come under fire lately — not only was she accused of raping her sister, many didn't believe her account of being raped herself.

[ Related: Lena Threatens To Sue Over Rape Accusations ]

She's now speaking up about that incident and giving her thoughts on the way the public has responded to it.

In an essay titled "Why I Chose To Speak Out", Lena writes:

"I was not naïve enough to believe the essay in my book would be met with pure empathy or wild applause. The topic of sexual assault is far more inflammatory and divisive than it should be, with tension building around definitions of consent, and fear ruling the dialogue. But I hoped beyond hope that the sensitive nature of the event would be honored, and that no one would attempt to reopen these wounds or deepen my trauma.

But this did not prove to be the case. I have had my character and credibility questioned at every turn. I have been attacked online with violent and misogynistic language. Reporters have attempted to uncover the identity of my attacker despite my sincerest attempts to protect this information. My work has been torn apart in an attempt to prove I am a liar, or worse, a deviant myself. My friends and family have been contacted. Articles have heralded "Lena Dunham's shocking confession." I have been made to feel, on multiple occasions, as though I am to blame for what happened."

Horrible!

And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

She goes into excruciating detail about what she's had to put up with since her book was released, and you can feel her frustration at the entire situation.

Read her full essay and feel her pain for yourself (below):

It has been almost a decade since I was sexually assaulted. It took me a long time to fully acknowledge what had happened and even longer to discuss it publicly, in the form of an essay in my book Not That Kind of Girl. When I finally decided to share my story, it had ambiguities and gray areas, because that's what I experienced, because that's what so many of us have experienced. As indicated in the beginning of the book, I made the choice to keep certain identities private, changing names and some descriptive details. To be very clear, "Barry" is a pseudonym, not the name of the man who assaulted me, and any resemblance to a person with this name is an unfortunate and surreal coincidence. I am sorry about all he has experienced.

Speaking out was never about exposing the man who assaulted me. Rather, it was about exposing my shame, letting it dry out in the sun. I did not wish to be contacted by him or to open a criminal investigation. I am in a loving and peaceful place in my life and I am not willing to sacrifice any more of it for this person I do not know, aside from one night I will never forget. That is my choice.

Like so many women who have been sexually assaulted, I did not report the incident to my college or to the police. Even when I visited my gynecologist complaining of pain, afraid I had contracted a sexually transmitted disease, I could only mumble through a description of that night. After all, I had been drunk and high, which only compounded my confusion and shame. And I was afraid. I was afraid that no one would believe me. I was afraid other potential partners would consider me damaged goods. I was afraid I was overreacting. I was afraid it was my fault. I was afraid he would be angry. Eight years later, I know just how classic these fears are. They are the reason that the majority of college women who are assaulted will never report it.

When I finally chose to share my story, I did not do so in a vacuum. I was inspired by all the brave women who are now coming forward with their own experiences, despite the many risks associated with speaking out. Survivors are so often re-victimized by a system that demands they prove their purity and innocence. They are asked to provide an unassailable narrative when the event itself is hazy, fragmented, and unspeakable. They are isolated and betrayed by people close to them who doubt their reality or are frustrated by their inability to move on. Their most intimate experiences are made public property.

As I was deciding to write about my assault, I was given deep strength by the viewers and readers who support my work, by my friends and family and feminist role models, and by my partner who is a man of incredible kindness and sensitivity. I was ready to admit to the ways being sexually assaulted has shaped my sense of self as a woman entering adulthood, compromised my emotional security, and haunted me even during the most joyful periods of my life. I hoped I might inspire others to share, and that forming these connections would assist us all in healing.

I was not naïve enough to believe the essay in my book would be met with pure empathy or wild applause. The topic of sexual assault is far more inflammatory and divisive than it should be, with tension building around definitions of consent, and fear ruling the dialogue. But I hoped beyond hope that the sensitive nature of the event would be honored, and that no one would attempt to reopen these wounds or deepen my trauma.

But this did not prove to be the case. I have had my character and credibility questioned at every turn. I have been attacked online with violent and misogynistic language. Reporters have attempted to uncover the identity of my attacker despite my sincerest attempts to protect this information. My work has been torn apart in an attempt to prove I am a liar, or worse, a deviant myself. My friends and family have been contacted. Articles have heralded "Lena Dunham's shocking confession." I have been made to feel, on multiple occasions, as though I am to blame for what happened.

But I don't believe I am to blame. I don't believe any of us who have been raped and/or assaulted are to blame. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter what is written about me individually. I accept the realities of being in the public eye. But I simply cannot allow my story to be used to cast doubt on other women who have been sexually assaulted.

I have a certain empathy for the journalists who asked me questions like whether I regret how much I drank that night or what my attacker would say if he was asked about me. These ignorant lines of inquiry serve to further flawed narratives about rape, but these people are reacting to the same set of social signals that we all are — signals telling us that preventing assault is a woman's job, that rape is only rape when a stranger drags you into a dark alley with a knife at your throat, that our stories are never true, and that lying about rape is a way for women to enact revenge on innocent men. These misconceptions about rape are rampant, destructive and precisely the thing that prevents survivors from seeking the support that they need and deserve.

Speaking out about the realities and complexities of sexual assault is how we begin to protect each other. I do not want our daughters born into a world that reacts to sexual violence against women in this way. This reaction, which ranges from skepticism to condemnation to threats of violence, is something I have been subject to as a woman in a position of extraordinary privilege. So let us then imagine the trauma experienced by low-income families, women of color, the trans community, survivors with disabilities, students on financial aid, sex workers, inmates, foster children, those who do not have my visibility, my access to medical and mental health care, or my financial and legal resources.

Prevention and response on campuses is only a small part of the problem with how we as a nation are handling sexual assault. But it's a good place to start. Educational spaces must be made safe, so that we leave them stronger and poised to enact change.

Since coming out as a survivor I have gone from an intellectual sense of the ways in which victims are doubted and debased to a bone-deep understanding of this reality. I hope to apply that understanding to art and advocacy. I am deeply grateful for the support I have received. I am deeply grateful that this dialogue is taking place. I am angry but I am not alone.

Survivors have the right to tell their stories, to take back control after the ultimate loss of control. There is no right way to survive rape and there is no right way to be a victim. What survivors need more than anything is to be supported, whether they choose to pursue a criminal investigation or to rebuild their world on their own terms. You can help by never defining a survivor by what has been taken from her. You can help by saying I believe you.

[Image via WENN.]

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9 comments to “Lena Dunham Explains Why She Opened Up About Her Rape In Brave New Essay”



  1. 1

    I was date raped in college by an older man I considered a friend, so I understand her point. HOWEVER if you do not expect or hope not to be held under a microscope when you make the decision to publish a book you are a fool. Whether they are right or wrong in doing so, by doing something PUBLIC, you open yourself to criticism as well as support. The good always comes with some bad. Want to "air it out"??? Talk to a shrink, friends, write a journal. Don't want to be scrutinized - do not go public. She opened herself up to what she is getting. May sound harsh but it is the truth.

  2. Edie says – reply to this


    2

    To say this individual is brave is laughable.

  3. joeyr says – reply to this


    3

    Nobody is watching her show!……..She needs publicity…….Why else?

  4. Annalisa says – reply to this


    4

    To say she is brave is so ridiculous. She is a liar and cheapens rape for all true rape survivors. She is also a pedophile. So congratulating her is disgusting. Perez pick deserving people to give props to. Not liars and creeps that molest their siblings.

  5. bTeri says – reply to this


    5

    Brave? Seriously? This over hyped entitled brat has ruined the life of an innocent man. She described her "rapist by name and very specific details that led to a man that never even met her. She did not say in the book it was a pseudonym (as she did in other passages and sitiuations). Lena Dunham and her publisher Random House sat on their hands for 2 months ignoring this mans pleas to publicly clarify it wasnt him. And now now Dunham and Random House are so terrified of a lawsuit they are changing the book and offering to pay his legal expenses. I hope he destroys them in court for this much deserved lawsuit that has set back rape victims rights fifty years.

  6. I'm biased for women says – reply to this


    6

    As long as she doesn't win the jackpot in the lottery and subsequently, Perez does not come to the only conclusion we should all congratulate her for this sudden good luck relative to a supposed good karma shitty-thing, because she would be so brave. But brave for what? For having raped her underage sibling? Worst. apparently that woman had falsely accused of rape an innocent man!

  7. The_J's_ Momma says – reply to this


    7

    SHE'S GARGBAGE!!
    SHE LOOKS LIKE A FAT SLOB!

    This is not brave!! She a molesting coward who points her sausage fingers while not accepting responsibility. You ever think her sister is a lesbian due to being molested??

  8. The_J's_ Momma says – reply to this


    8

    SHE'S GARBAGE!!
    SHE LOOKS LIKE A FAT SLOB!

    This is not brave!! She a molesting coward who points her sausage fingers while not accepting responsibility. You ever think her sister is a lesbian due to being molested??

  9. Esin Emko says – reply to this


    9

    This is right on and needs to be said again and again:

    bTeri says – reply to this

    Brave? Seriously? This over hyped entitled brat has ruined the life of an innocent man. She described her "rapist by name and very specific details that led to a man that never even met her. She did not say in the book it was a pseudonym (as she did in other passages and sitiuations). Lena Dunham and her publisher Random House sat on their hands for 2 months ignoring this mans pleas to publicly clarify it wasnt him. And now now Dunham and Random House are so terrified of a lawsuit they are changing the book and offering to pay his legal expenses. I hope he destroys them in court for this much deserved lawsuit that has set back rape victims rights fifty years.