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Mood Boosting Foods!

| Filed under: Exclusives!DietsFoodHealthMental HealthLisa DeFazio

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Feeling a little down lately? Your diet may be the problem! There are many foods that can lift your spirits!

Here are some Top Mood Boosting food recommendations:

Selenium

Studies suggest that selenium deficiency is linked to mood disorders.

10 Selenium Food Sources

1. Brazil Nuts
2. Eggs
3. Grains (wheat germ, barley, brown rice, oats)
4. Shellfish (oysters, mussels, shrimp, clams, scallops)
5. Meat (Beef, liver, lamb, pork)
6. chicken, turkey)
7. Sunflower Seeds
8. Mushrooms (button, crimini, shiitake)
9. Fish (tuna, halibut, salmon)
10. Onions

Omega-3 fatty acids

Researchers have found that cultures that eat foods with high levels of omega-3s have lower levels of depression. Fish containing higher levels of DHA and EPA omega-3 fatty acids include anchovies, bluefish, herring, mackerel, salmon (wild has more omega-3s than farmed), and tuna. Experts recommend eating these fish two to three times a week.

Tryptophan

Tryptophan is one of the 10 essential amino acids that the body uses to synthesize the proteins it needs. It produces nervous system messengers that promote relaxation, restfulness, and sleep.

Tryptophan is found in dairy foods, such as cheese and milk, meats, poultry, eggs and fish. In addition, soy, peanuts, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, beans and lentils contain high levels of tryptophan. Tryptophan increases serotonin levels, and is used in the treatment of insomnia, depression, and anxiety.

Vitamin D

The connection between Vitamin D deficiency and mood disorders has been found in several studies. These include major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), premenstrual syndrome and other depressive disorders. The flesh of fatty fish (such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel) and fish liver oils are among the best sources. Small amounts of vitamin D are found in beef liver, cheese, and egg yolks. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is not naturally present in many foods, it is added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. It is produced when ultraviolet rays from sunlight hit the skin and trigger vitamin D synthesis. Fortified foods and supplements provide most of the vitamin D in the American diet.

Lisa DeFazio’s a leading nutrition expert and a Master’s degree level Registered Dietitian, so be sure to check out her website for more tips and videos — and if U wanna know more about moods OR anything else, U can always email us at Questions@FitPerez.com!!

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