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EXCLUSIVE: Fun And Educational Winter Indoor Activities!

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During the cold, winter months when children are out of school for the holidays, they tend to be stuck inside, which can drive parents crazy.

Experts agree that it's important for kids to take a break, but it's just as equally important to keep their brains active, as well.

Thankfully, Perezito.com's educational expert Dr. Kim Har, director of early childhood education at the Aristotle Circle in NYC has some fun and educational indoor activities that will not only help the time go by faster, but will also be a fun bonding experience for both parent and child.

Dr. Kim Har says:

It is crucial that children stay engaged and continue to have active learning experiences when school is not in session. Here are some fun ways to keep your children’s minds busy over the winter break:

Make a thermometer. Build a thermometer with water, food coloring and a straw! Watch the thermometer move up and down as the liquid warms up. Are there any other things that your child can think of that rise as the temperature increases?

http://www.weatherwizkids.com/experiments-thermometer.htm

Make a snow globe. All you need is a baby food jar and some baby oil. Make one using water and another with oil. Have a discussion about why the glitter moves more slowly in the oil globe than in the water globe.

http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howtos/ht/snowglobe.htm

Salt the rocky road. Make ice cream in a plastic bag and then demonstrate the chemical effects of salt on ice. (Or just eat it!)

http://teachnet.com/lessonplans/science/plastic-bag-ice-cream-recipe/

An outdoorsy activity: Wait for a snowy day, and then go out and examine snowflake patterns using a magnifying glass.

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/watching/watching.htm

Try to see if you can identify any of the most common types of snowflakes.

http://library.thinkquest.org/3876/scienceofsnow.html

After you have studied the snowflakes, try growing your own snowflake crystals at home. (Recommended for older children. Close parental supervision advised for younger children)

http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howtos/ht/boraxsnowflake.htm

These even sound fun for US to do! Great ideas, Dr. Kim Har!

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