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Boy Raises Money For Seizure Alert Dog!

Filed under: InspirationHealthPetsCuteness!Dog

Evan Moss is a nine year old boy suffering from 10 minute long seizures.

The seizures started when he was one month old and doctors performed surgery on his brain at four years old, but the seizures returned two years later.

Now Evan has his pooch, Mindy, a dog who alerts the family when Evan goes into epilepsy.

The Moss family raised tons of money to get the trained doggie, driving from Virginia to Ohio to get her.

Now every time Evan has a seizure, Mindy is the first to know, and alerts Evan's parents.

A true lifesaver and a best friend!!!! Watch the video (above) now!

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Q&A: My Dog Has Seizures

Filed under: Q&AHealthDogDr. Patrick Mahaney

Dr. Patrick Mahaney

Having a pet is a big responsibility. Having a pet with a disability is a HUGE responsibility.

TeddyHilton.com reader, Jen, wrote in to Dr. Patrick Mahaney:

Hi Perez and Teddy- I read your blogs daily so I thought I'd write in to ask your pet experts a question. Before I ask, I i just wanted to stress that we have very good vet and neurologist. Buster is a 2 year old Cocapoo who has epilepsy, specifically idiopathic epilepsy. I'm 35 and this is my first pet and this whole situation is all very new to me.

Buster is on meds and they seem to work, but are you aware of any other ways to help with canine epilepsy?

Thank you very much.

Jen
Arlington, VA

Dr. Patrick responded:

Hello Jen,

Thank you for your readership of TeddyHilton.com and PerezHilton.com. We appreciate concerned pet owners, especially ones like you who are willing to reach out to discuss pet health.

Seizure activity can happen in dogs both young and old. In younger dogs, the diagnosis is typically idiopathic epilepsy, which is manageable with medication.

Besides medication, I'm pleased to hear that you are taking a holistic approach to managing Buster's seizures. I take this approach with my patients and employ Chinese medicine food energy treatments to "cool" the internal heat that often leads to seizures. Feed a moist (not dry) diet of whole food ingredients (meat, vegetables, grains). Cooling protein sources include turkey, duck, rabbit, and fish. Cooling carbohydrate sources include potato, brown rice, and barley. Cooling vegetable sources include spinach, broccoli, mushrooms, and cauliflower.

Do your best to reduce any source of inflammation or infection in the body. The mouth is a dirty place chock full of bacteria, which can cause gum inflammation and infection in other parts of the body. Keep Buster's mouth as clean as possible and have regular cleanings through your veterinarian if needed.

Reduce stress, exposure to extreme temperatures, and vaccinate judiciously. Consider performing antibody titers (blood tests) to see what Buster's levels are before giving him a vaccination to which he may already have adequate immunity.
Feel free to reach out to me through my website, www.patrickmahaney.com, to have further dialogue.

Thank you,

Dr Patrick Mahaney

Have any pet questions? Tweet them to Dr. Patrick HERE!! OR Check him out on facebook!

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